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Back Location: Shadyside

513 Shady Avenue

Renovated Victorian house containing seven one bedroom and two bedroom apartments.

Located in the heart of Shadyside's East End, this Victorian apartment building is only minutes from downtown Pittsburgh and major universities, such as the University of Pittsburgh, Carnegie Mellon University and Chatham University.

Situated near University of Pittsburgh Medical Center (UPMC) area hospitals and just a few blocks from the retail shops and restaurants on Walnut Street, South Highland Avenue and Ellsworth Avenue, this residence allows quick, convenient access to the best that Pittsburgh has to offer. Not only is this building on the primary public bus transit lines (Port Authority of Allegheny County - PAT) that serve city neighborhoods, including Oakland and downtown, but grocery stores Whole Foods, Trader Joe's and Giant Eagle are within walking distance. The tree-lined and quiet, residential streets of this historic neighborhood lend a suburban feel to this urban area.

Building History

On the eastern section of Pittsburgh's Shadyside, near the corner of Howe Street, two Second Empire houses known as 513 and 517 Shady Avenue have stood since their construction in approximately 1877...

Read more about this building's history ›

On the eastern section of Pittsburgh's Shadyside, near the corner of Howe Street, two Second Empire houses known as 513 and 517 Shady Avenue have stood since their construction in approximately 1877. Standing side-by-side, these sister houses have observed Shadyside's transition from large country estates to a desirable and prosperous city neighborhood.

Built as mirror images of each other, the three-story brick houses at 513 and 517 Shady Avenue reflect the very popular Second Empire Style of the Victorian era. Between 1860 and 1880, this architectural style dominated American architecture, both public and private, particularly in rapidly growing industrial cities of the American Northeast and Midwest.

Considered modern rather than retrospective, Second Empire buildings were easily identifiable by their distinctive roof lines: mansard roofs, dormer windows and cornices supporting decorative brackets. Their appearance and function were well-suited to Pittsburgh's narrow urban lots, as they made the structure appear less massive.

Contact Franklin West, Inc. for additional information about this and other similar buildings in the Shadyside neighborhood.

*Researched history prepared by Alina L. Keebler for Franklin West, Inc.

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